For some people, Islam is like ketchup. Life goes on with or without Islam.

Fries decidedly taste better with ketchup. But fries go on ketchup or no ketchup.

And, luckily, how many brands there are -- of ketchup. When you run from one, you can always find refuge in any of the others. For, after all, they all call themselves "ketchup."

So also Islam.

Every Islamic outfit not only calls itself "Islam," everybody even has a label that reads:

"The Only Real and Original Islam Ketchup. Directly From the First Tomatoes Ever Made!"

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If Muslims want to see a better world, they must stop making use of Islam and things Islamic with a profit motive -- meaning, to somehow make a buck, as they say, or to gain some kind of worldly benefit or advantage such as power, position, prestige, wealth, name, fame and all that.

Do that for five years and then see what happens to the world.

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Even though we all live – hopefully – in free and democratic societies, and operate by democratic norms, Working for Allah means constantly dedicating and rededicating ourselves, with single-mindedness, to our Program, our Jama'at and our Leadership.

Failure or hesitation to do that is indicative of breakdown of mental discipline and spiritual commitment on the part of individuals.

And it is suggestive of lack of personal growth and progress in one’s journey to Allah.

They are all instances of problems, and possibly ongoing struggles, inside people, many of which could be summed up under the rubric of Nafs – selfishness and self-centeredness.

Such individuals generally have a tendency to be focused on themselves rather than on the Jama'at, the Program and the Leadership with which they are supposed to be working.

At that level, it is generally a problem of what is called Ikhlas and Iman.

Left unaddressed, these issues will come to the fore sooner or later, as the Jama’at continues to plod along in the pursuit of its goals.

And these individuals, unless they correct their attitudes in time, may turn out to be a problem to the Jama’at and the work down the road.

(Dr. Pasha)

“There are those who organize all kinds of grandiose conferences for Muslims. And invite all kinds of good Muslims to those conferences. And fill them with all kinds of good food, sumptuous accommodations and great Islamic speeches laced with liberal references to the Qur’an, to the Hadith and to all things good and past and remote.

And then they pull out their golden bugles and begin blowing on them. “Go after the enemies of Islam,” they tell the Muslims.

“And beware of the enemies of Muslims,” they warn the Muslims.

Good Muslims who attend these gala events on special invitation from special people in the Muslim world listen to the great speeches by the great sheiks, shake the hands of great leaders, partake of the sumptuous feasts, and hobnob with those they think are of greater wealth and power or of higher status than themselves.

I have a bit of advice to the good Muslims who attend these conferences: Next time around, take a pocket mirror with you. Borrow one from your ladies, if they are the kind who will carry a mirror in their purses and vanity bags.

And then, just as the great big Muslim leaders and their equally great big Islamic sheiks bugle you to go get the enemies of Islam and Muslims, reach for that little mirror in your pocket, make sure it works, polish it if you need to, and then hold it right in front of their grand noses.

Tell them: “Yes, Your Eminence!”

Tell them “Of course, Your Highness.”

And then very quietly ask them to take a peek in the mirror you are holding. But don’t tell them it was my idea. Pretend it was yours. There will be other pretenders there to keep you company.” (Dr. Pasha)